Apple and Johnson & Johnson begin a study to reduce the risk of stroke

Johnson and Johnson

Health has become a key issue for Apple. And it seems very successful. We are increasingly attending new studies by the company to see how their devices can help people’s health.

The start of a new American study by Apple in collaboration with Johnson & Johnson on how Apple Watch and iPhone can help collect very important data for the study and prevention of vascular diseases has come to light today like cerebral stroke. Bravo for the two companies.

Apple and Johnson & Johnson today announced the start of a new study called “Heartline Study” that aims to gather more information about atrial fibrillation and the like with Apple devices: iPhone and Apple Watch.

This study is based on an application for such devices that will study the follow-up cardiac data collected to see if they can increase alerts to possible vascular complications such as stroke.

It will be based on collecting data from users over 65 years. Apple and Johnson & Johnson want to study the data collected by the Apple Watch, to see if such information can help reduce the risk of stroke thanks to the early detection of atrial fibrillation, detectable thanks to the Apple Watch ECG.

The main problem of atrial fibrillation is that it has no obvious symptoms in which it suffers, so it is very difficult to diagnose. Thanks to the Apple Watch, you can alert the user who has an atrial fibrillation crisis even if the person does not notice it.

People interested in participating in the study must be 65 years of age or older and be US residents. They must have traditional Medicare, own an iPhone 6s or later and agree to provide their health information to the study. After a selection process, two groups will be created: one group will use only one application on their mobile, and the participants of the other group will be provided with an Apple Watch for data collection. The study will last three years.

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